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Class Catalog

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Always wanted to take a class that discussed sexual and relationship violence, stalking, and sexual harassment? Interested in learning more about the intersectionality between interpersonal violence and other forms of oppression? Check out the courses below highlighted by the SHARE Office for more opportunities.

 


AFRICAAM 192: Sexual Violence in America (AMSTUD 258, CSRE 192E, FEMGEN 258, FEMGEN 358, HISTORY 258, HISTORY 358)

This undergraduate/graduate colloquium explores the history of sexual violence in America, with particular attention to the intersections of gender and race in the construction of rape. We discuss the changing definitions of sexual violence in law and in cultural representations from early settlement through the late-twentieth century, including slavery, wartime and prison rape, the history of lynching and anti-lynching movements, and feminist responses to sexual violence. In addition to introducing students to the literature on sexual violence, the course attempts to teach critical skills in the analysis of secondary and primary historical texts. Students write short weekly reading responses and a final paper; no final exam; fifth unit research or CEL options. Limited enrollment, permission of instructor required. Submit application form (available in course syllabus or History department main office, 200-113) by November 15, 2016 and indicate interest in CEL option. Priority admission to History, FGSS, CSRE, AFRICAAM, and AMSTUD declared majors and minors. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)

Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

Instructors: Freedman, E. (PI)

Schedule for AFRICAAM 192

 


AMSTUD 107: Introduction to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (CSRE 108, FEMGEN 101, TAPS 108)

Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches to gender, sexuality, queer, trans and feminist studies. Topics include the emergence of sexuality studies in the academy, social justice and new subjects, science and technology, art and activism, history, film and memory, the documentation and performance of difference, and relevant socio-economic and political formations such as work and the family. Students learn to think critically about race, gender, and sexuality from local and global perspectives.

Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

Instructors: Fonrobert, C. (PI)

Schedule for AMSTUD 107

 


AMSTUD 258: Sexual Violence in America (AFRICAAM 192, CSRE 192E, FEMGEN 258, FEMGEN 358, HISTORY 258, HISTORY 358)

This undergraduate/graduate colloquium explores the history of sexual violence in America, with particular attention to the intersections of gender and race in the construction of rape. We discuss the changing definitions of sexual violence in law and in cultural representations from early settlement through the late-twentieth century, including slavery, wartime and prison rape, the history of lynching and anti-lynching movements, and feminist responses to sexual violence. In addition to introducing students to the literature on sexual violence, the course attempts to teach critical skills in the analysis of secondary and primary historical texts. Students write short weekly reading responses and a final paper; no final exam; fifth unit research or CEL options.nnLimited enrollment, permission of instructor required. Submit application form (available in course syllabus or History department main office, 200-113) by November 15, 2016 and indicate interest in CEL option. Priority admission to History, FGSS, CSRE, AFRICAAM, and AMSTUD declared majors and minors. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)

Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

Instructors: Freedman, E. (PI)

Schedule for AMSTUD 258

 


CHILATST 111: Curander@s, remedios y espiritualidad: Chican@/Latin@ healing practices

Understanding Chican@/Latin@ curandero traditions, remedios, brujeria and spirituality provides insights into the importance of such healing practices in everyday Chican@/Latin@ life. Through this course, we examine curanderismo and folk healing practices from interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspectives to understand the mestizo and indigenous healing practices of Chican@s/Latin@s. How intersections of gender, race, class, and sexuality inform such practices and traditions is also explored in this course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Prieto, L. (PI)
Schedule for CHILATST 111


CSRE 192E: Sexual Violence in America (AFRICAAM 192, AMSTUD 258, FEMGEN 258, FEMGEN 358, HISTORY 258, HISTORY 358)

This undergraduate/graduate colloquium explores the history of sexual violence in America, with particular attention to the intersections of gender and race in the construction of rape. We discuss the changing definitions of sexual violence in law and in cultural representations from early settlement through the late-twentieth century, including slavery, wartime and prison rape, the history of lynching and anti-lynching movements, and feminist responses to sexual violence. In addition to introducing students to the literature on sexual violence, the course attempts to teach critical skills in the analysis of secondary and primary historical texts. Students write short weekly reading responses and a final paper; no final exam; fifth unit research or CEL options.nnLimited enrollment, permission of instructor required. Submit application form (available in course syllabus or History department main office, 200-113) by November 15, 2016 and indicate interest in CEL option. Priority admission to History, FGSS, CSRE, AFRICAAM, and AMSTUD declared majors and minors. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)

Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

Instructors: Freedman, E. (PI)

Schedule for CSRE 192E

 


EDUC 193P: Peer Counseling at the Bridge

Mental health issues such as relationships, substance abuse, sexual assault, depression, eating disorders, academic stressors, suicide, and grief and bereavement. Guest speakers.

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

Instructors: Katz-Lindquist, S. (PI) Martinez, A. (PI) Gandingco, C. (TA) ... more instructors for EDUC 193P »

Schedule for EDUC 193P

 


EDUC 193S: Peer Counseling on Comprehensive Sexual Health

Information on sexually transmitted infections and diseases, and birth control methods. Topics related to sexual health such as communication, societal attitudes and pressures, pregnancy, abortion, and the range of sexual expression. Role-play and peer-education outreach projects. Required for those wishing to counsel at the Sexual Health Peer Resource Center (SHPRC).

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

Instructors: Yisrael, D. (PI)

Schedule for EDUC 193S


ETHICSOC 173: Introduction to Feminist Philosophy (FEMGEN 173R, PHIL 90R)

If feminism is a political practice aimed at ending patriarchy, what is the point of feminist philosophy? This course provides an introduction to feminist philosophy by exploring how important theoretical questions around sex and gender bear on practical ethical and political debates. The first part of the course will examine some of the broader theoretical questions in feminist philosophy, including: the metaphysics of gender, the demands of intersectionality, and feminist critiques of capitalism and liberalism. Questions will include: How should we understand the category `woman¿? How does gender intersect with other axes of oppression? Is capitalism inherently patriarchal? The second part of the course will address more applied topics of ethical and political debate, such as: objectification, pornography, consent, markets in women¿s sexual and reproductive labor, and the institution of marriage.

Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

Instructors: Carnegy-Arbuthnott, H. (PI)

Schedule for ETHICSOC 173

 


FEMGEN 107P: Momcore, Me Too, and Hook-Ups: Gender, Sexuality, and Power in Politics and Practice

Students bring widely varying experiences of relationships, whether romantic, familial, platonic, sexual, or professional. This course provides students an opportunity to explore how power functions in these relationships. Relying on feminist critiques of power, students will examine how constructions of gender and sexuality impact our daily lives as well as how we relate to others in those relationships while negotiating power. Activities, readings, and discussions will prompt students to reflect on ways society constructs sex, gender, and intimacy via media and politics. We will explore the following themes through an intersectional lens: codes of masculinity, concepts and practicalities of affirmative consent in straight and LGBTQIA contexts, sexual harassment and sexual empowerment, and the lived experience of dating, romance, and relationships.

Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

Instructors: Crandall, M. (PI) Hanlon, P. (PI)

Schedule for FEMGEN 107P

 


FEMGEN 134D: Sex, Courtship, and Marriage in America (SOC 134D)

How people meet, who they date, and when they settle down have all changed dramatically in recent decades. This course will provide students with a thorough overview of demographic, sociological, and historical perspectives on sex, relationships, and family in the United States. Students will become familiar with the empirical patterns and trends, political and cultural debates, and policy issues concerning historical and modern romantic and sexual relationships, as well as the major theories and research methods used in the sociological study of relationships. Throughout the course, we will explore how changes in modern relationships may affect broader patterns of social inequality and family structure. Additionally, we will examine how the mate selection process intersects with various aspects of gender, sexuality, class, race, and technology.

Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

Instructors: Orth, T. (PI)

Schedule for FEMGEN 134D

 


FEMGEN 143 (LAW 7065) (SOC 188) : One in Five: The Law, Politics, and Policy of Campus Sexual Assault (SOC 188)

TRIGGER WARNING: Over the past three years, the issue of campus sexual assault has exploded into the public discourse. While definitive figures are difficult to obtain due to the necessarily private nature of these events, several recent studies estimate that between 20-25% of college women (and a potentially higher proportion of students identifying as transgender and gender-nonconforming, as well as around 5-10% of male students) experience sexual assault. People of color, LGBT students, disabled individuals and other vulnerable groups are at increased risk. This is also a significant problem in k12 education. Survivors have come forward across the country with harrowing stories of assault followed by what they describe as an insensitive or indifferent response from college administrators. These survivors have launched one of the most successful, and surprising, social movements in recent memory. As a result, the federal government under President Obama stepped up its civil rights en more »

Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

Instructors: Dauber, M. (PI)

Schedule for FEMGEN 143

 


FEMGEN 173R: Introduction to Feminist Philosophy (ETHICSOC 173, PHIL 90R)

If feminism is a political practice aimed at ending patriarchy, what is the point of feminist philosophy? This course provides an introduction to feminist philosophy by exploring how important theoretical questions around sex and gender bear on practical ethical and political debates. The first part of the course will examine some of the broader theoretical questions in feminist philosophy, including: the metaphysics of gender, the demands of intersectionality, and feminist critiques of capitalism and liberalism. Questions will include: How should we understand the category `woman¿? How does gender intersect with other axes of oppression? Is capitalism inherently patriarchal? The second part of the course will address more applied topics of ethical and political debate, such as: objectification, pornography, consent, markets in women¿s sexual and reproductive labor, and the institution of marriage.

Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

Schedule for FEMGEN 173R

 


FEMGEN 258: Sexual Violence in America (AFRICAAM 192, AMSTUD 258, CSRE 192E, FEMGEN 358, HISTORY 258, HISTORY 358)

This undergraduate/graduate colloquium explores the history of sexual violence in America, with particular attention to the intersections of gender and race in the construction of rape. We discuss the changing definitions of sexual violence in law and in cultural representations from early settlement through the late-twentieth century, including slavery, wartime and prison rape, the history of lynching and anti-lynching movements, and feminist responses to sexual violence. In addition to introducing students to the literature on sexual violence, the course attempts to teach critical skills in the analysis of secondary and primary historical texts. Students write short weekly reading responses and a final paper; no final exam; fifth unit research or CEL options.nnLimited enrollment, permission of instructor required. Submit application form (available in course syllabus or History department main office, 200-113) by November 15, 2016 and indicate interest in CEL option. Priority admission to History, FGSS, CSRE, AFRICAAM, and AMSTUD declared majors and minors. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)

Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

Instructors: Freedman, E. (PI)

Schedule for FEMGEN 258

 


FEMGEN 358: Sexual Violence in America (AFRICAAM 192, AMSTUD 258, CSRE 192E, FEMGEN 258, HISTORY 258, HISTORY 358)

This undergraduate/graduate colloquium explores the history of sexual violence in America, with particular attention to the intersections of gender and race in the construction of rape. We discuss the changing definitions of sexual violence in law and in cultural representations from early settlement through the late-twentieth century, including slavery, wartime and prison rape, the history of lynching and anti-lynching movements, and feminist responses to sexual violence. In addition to introducing students to the literature on sexual violence, the course attempts to teach critical skills in the analysis of secondary and primary historical texts. Students write short weekly reading responses and a final paper; no final exam; fifth unit research or CEL options.nnLimited enrollment, permission of instructor required. Submit application form (available in course syllabus or History department main office, 200-113) by November 15, 2016 and indicate interest in CEL option. Priority admission to History, FGSS, CSRE, AFRICAAM, and AMSTUD declared majors and minors. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)

Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

Instructors: Freedman, E. (PI)

Schedule for FEMGEN 358

 


FILMSTUD 102: Theories of the Moving Image (FILMSTUD 302)

Major theoretical arguments and debates about cinema: realism,formalism, poststructuralism, feminism, postmodernism, and phenomenology. Prerequisites: FILMSTUD 4. WIM at 4 units only.

Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

Instructors: Oeler, K. (PI)

Schedule for FILMSTUD 102

 


GERMAN 155: Global Black Feminism

Students will examine the long history of Black feminists in a variety of international spaces (including Europe, Asia, the Caribbean, and the U.S). Students will see how these international spaces have informed the ideology of many Black feminists. In particular, students will read from Miss Mary Seacole, Mary Church Terrell, Audre Lorde, May Ayim, Angela Davis, and many more.

Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

Instructors: Watkins, J. (PI)

Schedule for GERMAN 155

 


GSBGEN 370: Power of You: Women and Leadership

Society needs confident, skilled and agile female professionals at every career level, especially in the earlier stages of their career, which provide the platform for future leadership opportunities. Female leaders face the same challenges as male leaders do, but female leaders also encounter an additional set of challenges (sociological, institutional, economic, cultural, social, familial, personal, sexual) that their male counterparts most likely will not. The same is true for female entrepreneurs, board members, managers, CEOs, social changemakers, educators and beyond, regardless of their career stage, access and background. Effectively overcoming female-specific challenges requires awareness, confidence and a practical skill-set that will be developed through an academic grounding in research, frameworks and case studies. Through a personalized learning model, students will apply learnings through active participation in in-class discussions and simulations, directly engage with industry leaders, and develop an individual leadership plan.

Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

Instructors: Arrillaga, L. (PI)

Schedule for GSBGEN 370

 


HUMBIO 125: Current Topics and Controversies in Women's Health (FEMGEN 256, OBGYN 256)

Interdisciplinary. Focus is primarily on the U.S., with selected global women's health topics. Topics include: leading causes of morbidity and mortality across the life course; reproductive (e.g. gynecologic & obstetric) health issues; sexual function; importance of lifestyle (e.g. diet, exercise, weight control), including eating disorders; mental health; sexual and relationship abuse; issues for special populations. In-class Student Debates on key controversies in women's health. Guest lecturers. For Ways credit eligibility, students must enroll in HUMBIO 125 for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade. PhD minor in FGSS, enroll in FEMGEN 256 for 2 - 3 units and for a letter grade. Med students enroll in OBGYN 256 for 2 units. Undergraduate prerequisite: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-SI | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

Instructors: Stefanick, M. (PI)

Schedule for HUMBIO 125

 


HUMBIO 170A: Sex and the Law

This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to examine the laws and regulation of sex in the United States by considering the legal, policy, social, political and scientific bases (or lack thereof) of such laws, the context and objectives of sex regulation, and the political dynamics of contemporary and controversial issues presented by this subject. Some laws reflect policies to protect persons from harm related to sexual conduct, such as rape, assault and pedophilia. Other laws impose notions of morality, such as sodomy, incest or polygamy, or homosexuality, or reflect policy or social judgments regarding abortion, contraceptives, and sexual activity of minors. Regulation often concern consensual conduct. This course will consider these topics from varying perspectives and policy objectives, and in the context of Constitutional and other liberty interests. Prerequisite: Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.

Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

Instructors: Abrams, W. (PI)

Schedule for HUMBIO 170A

 


LAW 5808: The Law of Bystanders and Upstanders (Reading Group)

What duties do or should bystanders have to intervene in crimes (e.g., sexual assault) and crises (e.g., drowning)? What rewards and immunities should upstanders receive? What Good Samaritan laws (which eliminate liability for interveners) and Bad Samaritan laws (which penalize non-intervention) exist, how could they be improved, and how do they vary per type of crime, crisis, or jurisdiction? This reading group will explore the law of bystanders and upstanders and how such carrots and sticks could be strengthened, standardized, and spread. Class meeting dates: TBA. Elements use in grading: Attendance, Class Participation.

Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F

Instructors: Kaufman, Z. (PI)

Schedule for LAW 5808


LAW 7013: Gender, Law, and Public Policy

(Formerly 307) Topics in this course will include equal protection standards, employment, family, reproductive rights, sexual harassment, rape, domestic violence, pornography, sexual orientation, diversity in the profession, and intersections with race, ethnicity, class, and sexual orientation. Special attention will be given to reproductive justice issues, and students (with the exception of 1Ls) who wish to give special attention to this topic may seek an extra unit of credit for directed research (see Directed Research Petition on the SLS Registrar's Office website). Materials will include cases, commentary, problems, and media portrayals. Special Instructions: Course requirements will include class participation and either (1) a long paper, which will satisfy the research requirement or (2) short weekly reflection papers on the assigned readings, and a short final research paper. Students writing reflection papers will form teams and each member will be responsible for writing comm more »

Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

Instructors: Rhode, D. (PI)

Schedule for LAW 7013

 


LAW 7065: One in Five: The Law, Politics, and Policy of Campus Sexual Assault

TRIGGER WARNING: Over the past three years, the issue of campus sexual assault has exploded into the public discourse. While definitive figures are difficult to obtain due to the necessarily private nature of these events, several recent studies estimate that between 20-25% of college women (and a potentially higher proportion of students identifying as transgender and gender-nonconforming, as well as around 5-10% of male students) experience sexual assault. People of color, LGBT students, disabled individuals and other vulnerable groups are at increased risk. This is also a significant problem in k12 education. Survivors have come forward across the country with harrowing stories of assault followed by what they describe as an insensitive or indifferent response from college administrators. These survivors have launched one of the most successful, and surprising, social movements in recent memory. As a result, the federal government under President Obama stepped up its civil rights en more »

Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

Instructors: Dauber, M. (PI)

Schedule for LAW 7065

 


LINGUIST 156: Language and Gender (FEMGEN 156X)

The role of language in the construction of gender, the maintenance of the gender order, and social change. Field projects explore hypotheses about the interaction of language and gender. No knowledge of linguistics required.

Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

Instructors: Eckert, P. (PI) Esposito, L. (TA) Lake, E. (TA)

Schedule for LINGUIST 156

 


MED 108Q: Human Rights and Health

Preference to sophomores. History of human-rights law. International conventions and treaties on human rights as background for social and political changes that could improve the health of groups and individuals. Topics such as: regional conflict and health, the health status of refugees and internally displaced persons; child labor; trafficking in women and children; HIV/AIDS; torture; poverty, the environment and health; access to clean water; domestic violence and sexual assault; and international availability of drugs. Possible optional opportunities to observe at community sites where human rights and health are issues. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs including Doctors Without Borders; McMaster University Institute for Peace Studies; UC Berkeley Human Rights Center; Kiva. PowerPoint presentation on topic of choice required.

Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

Instructors: Laws, A. (PI)

Schedule for MED 108Q

 


NATIVEAM 221: Crafting Challenging Conversations in a Conflicted World (CSRE 221D)

In moments of divisive, time-sensitive conflict and disagreement, interdependent community groups that are we-us oriented often struggle to maintain cohesive relationships. In this interactive, project-based course, participants will dive into the art of designing new products, services, or experiences for conflict. Throughout the course, participants can expect to unpack the fundamentals of design thinking and components of strong listening, leadership, and effective cultural competency. Individual one-on-one conversations as well as indigenous forms of group-interviewing, known as Peacemaking and Ho'oponopono, will be also explored. At the end of the course, students can expect to have created a low-resolution prototype based on qualitative research that answers the question: How might we lead with community-centered approaches, rather than with independent, divisive reactions in moments of conflict?

Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

Instructors: Biestman, K. (PI) Scully, A. (PI)

Schedule for NATIVEAM 221

 


PHIL 90R: Introduction to Feminist Philosophy (ETHICSOC 173, FEMGEN 173R)

If feminism is a political practice aimed at ending patriarchy, what is the point of feminist philosophy? This course provides an introduction to feminist philosophy by exploring how important theoretical questions around sex and gender bear on practical ethical and political debates. The first part of the course will examine some of the broader theoretical questions in feminist philosophy, including: the metaphysics of gender, the demands of intersectionality, and feminist critiques of capitalism and liberalism. Questions will include: How should we understand the category `woman¿? How does gender intersect with other axes of oppression? Is capitalism inherently patriarchal? The second part of the course will address more applied topics of ethical and political debate, such as: objectification, pornography, consent, markets in women¿s sexual and reproductive labor, and the institution of marriage.

Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

Instructors: Carnegy-Arbuthnott, H. (PI)

Schedule for PHIL 90R

 


PUBLPOL 103E: Ethics on the Edge Public Policy Core Seminar (PUBLPOL 203E)

This seminar-style course will explore additional foundational readings on organizational ethics (business, non-profit, and governmental organizations) and policy ethics. Themes will include, among others: race and police brutality incidents; national security (including cyber threats); the Iran nuclear agreement; Brexit; non-profit organizations in the policy and US landscape; sexual harassment networks; and various corporate matters. Organizing themes include, among others: ethics of leadership; ethics of persuasion and compromise; influence of bias in organizational and policy ethics; ethics of social movements; discrepancies between discourse and action; emotion and ethics; and interpreting and explaining ethics. In addition, the course will offer training in a wide variety of skills for effective communication of ethics for policy purposes (developing succinct arguments, presentations, website discourse, commenting in meetings and conferences, interviews, statement of personal vie more »

Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

Instructors: Liautaud, S. (PI)

Schedule for PUBLPOL 103E

 

 


SOMGEN 160: Flip the Script

This course is a sexual assault resistance education course designed specifically for university women. The course is based on theory, research evidence, and best practices for helping women resist acquaintance sexual assault. The course consists of four core components in which information is provided and skills are taught and practiced, with the goal of being able to asses risk, overcome barriers in acknowledging danger, and engage in effective verbal and physical self-defense. The social script we too often hear says:nWomen should live in constant fear of sexual violence. nWomen must sacrifice their freedom to dress how they want, go where they want, and socialize how they want to avoid sexual assault. nIf a woman is sexually assaulted, she is at least partially to blame. nIt is a man's responsibility to initiate the sexual activity that he wants. nnDo you think this social script is wrong? We sure do. Let's flip the script. nnThis class will have one lecture during the first week of classes (specific time and class location will be set by your section instructor). Then this course will break into sections.

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

Schedule for SOMGEN 160

 


TAPS 21S: StoryCraft: Athlete Relationships (FEMGEN 21S)

What is intimacy like as an athlete? What are the stereotypes and the realities? In this class, athletic-identifying students will learn about relationships from the inside out: through an examination and telling of their lived experiences. We will explore various perspectives on intimacy and relationships that illuminate different aspects of our lives and then dive into our own stories to discover the many facets of intimacy. Due to the personal nature of the topic, we will emphasize safety, trust, and confidentiality throughout. The class offers the structure and guidance to 1) mine your life for stories, 2) craft the structure and shape of your stories, and 3) perform with presence, authenticity, and connection. Students will be selected from this class to tell their stories in Beyond The Score: Intimacy & Relationships in Spring 2019. Before enrolling, ensure that you will be on campus Week 1 of Spring 2019 for the performance.nnStudents will be selected from this class to tell their stories in Beyond Sex Ed: Intimacy & Relationships in Winter 2019. Before enrolling, ensure that you will be on campus Winter 2019 for the performance.nnThis class will be held in Kingscote Gardens 140.

Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

Instructors: Booth, B. (PI)

Schedule for TAPS 21S

 


*Listing here does not imply endorsement by the SHARE Office. Last updated March 2019.