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The PEERs

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PEERs logo which reads Prevent, Educate, Empower, Refer

The PEERs (Prevent, Educate, Empower, Refer) are paid undergraduate (and coterm) student health educators that Prevent harms, Educate about holistic health and well-being, Empower our community, and Refer students to campus resources. They are trained in the fundamentals of public health as it relates to the following topic areas: substance use, sexual citizenship (sexual violence prevention), and mental health and well-being.

PEERs promote an integrated model of health and well-being that recognizes these topics do not exist within a vacuum of one another.  They are educators who can speak to the nuances of where topics overlap and diverge and how they directly relate to the student experience.

PEERs tabling for Fentanyl Awareness Day in May 2023

PEERs tabling for Fentanyl Awareness Day 2023 to raise awareness on the opioid epidemic and promote Narcan training (to reverse opioid overdoses)

How do I find PEER led workshops and outreaches?

Any student organization, house/dorm, or individual is able to attend weekly PEER trainings held at the Well House or request group-specific workshops by RSVPing here: https://forms.gle/qL3FXxY8m79GzzaG8

Check out the PEERs' Instagram @stanfordpeers to see which upcoming workshops and outreaches you want to drop in on!

You’ll also see PEERs facilitating workshops and programming throughout various campus communities and within neighborhoods. You may also find them tabling during national awareness events.

What Does Being a PEER Entail?

PEERs receive ongoing intensive training from both SUPER and the SHARE Education teams as well as other campus partners across departments who specialize in topics related to health and wellbeing.

PEERs conduct outreach education programs and workshops across undergraduate campus neighborhoods on topics involving alcohol/drug use, sexual citizenship, and mental health and wellbeing. They specialize in population-level public health initiatives rather than one-on-one support.  

PEERs are active members of the wellness community and table on campus to promote awareness on public health issues. PEERs work up to 10 paid hours a week.

What Does a Typical Week Look Like Working As a PEER?

A typical week for a PEER includes attending weekly team meetings and being out in community neighborhoods conducting outreach education programs and tabling for national awareness weeks. PEERs also gather at times to put together resource materials and kits for various events. 

Each week, PEERs will spend time with their professional supervisors, each other, and with lead student PEER mentors.

How Do I Become a PEER?

The only pre-requisite to apply to be a PEER is a passion for the health and wellbeing of your peers and a desire to learn about public health. If selected, you would engage in 32 hours of training in fundamentals and ongoing in-service trainings throughout the academic year. The role commitment is for one academic year with the possibility of continuing on in subsequent academic years. 

The 2023-2024 application process is now CLOSED. Applications will open again in the Spring/Summer of 2024.

PEERs tabling for Denim Day 2023

PEERs tabling for Denim Day 2023 with a focus on decreasing victim-blaming and debunking myths related to sexual violence and substance use.

More About the PEERs Program

The PEERs program is a collaboration between the Office of Substance Use Programs Education and Resources (SUPER) and the SHARE Title IX Office, with support from Well-being at Stanford.

For background, the ASSU passed a resolution in 2020 supporting ongoing prevention education for all students. Simultaneously, students and ResEd professional staff have asked for continuing education opportunities in their residences. The PEERs program aims to meet the health and wellbeing education needs of our community in an evidence-based manner. 

If you have questions, comments, or feedback, please feel free to reach out to  peerprogram@stanford.edu.